Do the spaces in your home look like cluttered disaster zones?

 

If so, welcome to motherhood. 

 

I’m not saying that moms are disorganized and messy. Not at all. 

 

I am saying that because we are raising little people, we have to make a bigger effort to stay organized and get rid of clutter.

 

So, if your dining room table is piled high with papers and your living room is a mess of toys, shoes, and furniture…these next sentences are for you.

 

First, you have what it takes to get organized. (Even if it’s deep down inside)

 

How do I know?

 

Because if I can, a procrastinating lover of stuff, you definitely can too!

 

Now that we know you can do it, here is how you can get it done.

 

get rid of clutter declutter your home

HOW TO GET RID OF CLUTTER AND LIVE ABUNDANTLY

1. STOP THE BUILDUP OF CLUTTER (FIND THE LEAKS)

You may be thinking… What leaks?  Let me explain.

 

Clutter is a build up of stuff.

 

Think of it like water. If you don’t stop the water from coming in, the area will stay wet. We want to dry it out. To do this we first have to find where the clutter is coming in, the leaks.

 

For me, this meant no more fast fashion, no more ‘window’ shopping at Target, and no more random trips to HomeGoods.

 

I had leaks everywhere but when I stopped shopping the amount of stuff/clutter coming in slowed to almost a complete stop. With less stuff coming in, I was able to focus on what I already had.

 

Question: Where are your leaks? What things can you stop buying right now to stop the flow of clutter?

 

2. EVALUATE THE POSSESIONS YOU HAVE

Once, you stop clutter from coming in, it’s time to evaluate what you have.

 

I realized I was shopping for sport and not for necessity and the clutter was a result of some of my poor choices. I started looking around and quickly saw I had much more than I needed. 

 

I realized I was shopping for sport and not for necessity.

 

Knowing that I would have to do a massive purge, I decided to begin evaluating what things I really valued and what things were FOMO (fear of missing out) purchases. 

 

Did I really need that thing or was it just a trendy must-have I wanted to try?

 

I had stuff that was never opened, never worn, and never used (I’m looking at you exercise equipment). You too?

 

Question: How much of the stuff you have to you absolutely love and value? How much of it was bought out of boredom or FOMO?

 

3. PURGE (GET RID OF THINGS YOU DON’T NEED)

Purge sounds like a bad word. I know.

 

But after evaluating everything you have, you will likely come to the conclusion that more than 50% (I’m being generous) of all the stuff can be purged. Yep. For every two items you can pick up, one can be discarded.

 

It’s not easy. 

 

If you are like me you really believe you will use that thing, wear that thing, or make time for that thing.

 

I’m encouraging you to let that thing go. Sell it. Donate it. Get it out of your home.

 

It’s a process that can be overwhelming but think of each item as a weight to be carried. Every time you let something go, you get lighter. 

 

At the end of the process, hopefully, you are only holding on to the things that give you real enjoyment and value. 

 

Truly living is only holding on to the things that really matter.

 

Question: Are you ready to do a massive purge? Can you go through rooms in your home and get rid of things that aren’t adding value or purpose?

 

 

4. BE INTENTIONAL ABOUT NEW PURCHASES

Decluttering can become a cyclical process without a system or process for stuff coming in and going out.

 

To stop the buildup of stuff from happening again and again, make up your mind to take control and be intentional about every purchase.

 

For example, when I need personal items like socks. I go through all my socks, get rid of the ones that are worn and then I purchase more. 

 

How does this help?

  1. I’m proactively deciding I need something.
  2. I’m choosing to remove items that are no longer quality.
  3. I’m replacing the items with new items I know I will use right away.

 

I no longer go to the store and look around and hope to find things I want. I am intentional about how I spend my resources and I use a process.

 

I’m in control of what’s coming in (no more leaks).

 

Question: Are there some processes you can put in place to control how much stuff you allow in your home?

 

 

5. BE OK WITH OWNING LESS

Less isn’t a bad thing. 

 

Talk about aha moments. I used to think the more I had the better but that’s not true at all.

  • I don’t need more shoes, I just need a few pairs of quality shoes.
  • I don’t need more products, I need quality products that work.

 

Shifting from a focus on quality instead of quantity is life changing.

 

I have more space to do cartwheels (not really, maybe some stretching and squats) and I save money.

 

Owning less lowers stress about how much I have to manage, clean, and organize. I look around my home and mostly (I’m always a work in progress) everything has a purpose and that makes me smile.

 

Question: Are you OK with owning less. Can you do a massive purge and not feel the need to replace everything. Can you accept having beautiful opens spaces in your home?

 

DECLUTTERING VS MINIMALISM

Decluttering is a process that can lead to minimalism and that’s a choice. 

 

Some people think that minimalism is about depriving yourself of luxuries but I disagree. Minimalism is a spectrum and if you can live with less and be happy then go for it. However, if you are giving up enjoying life to prove you can live with less, that doesn’t seem worth it. 

 

 

Stuff can be replaced but having a clutter-free home is an experience I think you will enjoy. I hope these tips help you declutter and focus on the people, events, and experiences that really matter. 

 

DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS THAT HELP YOU GET RID OF CLUTTER?


 

 

Hi! I’m Tiffany a mom to one sweet baby girl and wife to my college sweetheart. I use my masters in family life and youth development [and caffeine] to help pregnant women and moms get organized and budget. Find me at damngoodmom.com.